Corner Of River Road And Wilderness Drive

Running roughly parallel to the Rio Grande for 51 miles, the River Road is a varied and scenic day-long drive. As of 2 months ago, most vehicles would have fared OK but check road conditions first. I love driving rough roads but hubby hogged all the fun this time. That was OK since I was gawking at scenery and taking photos. At top is a good section of road, then 3 scenes beyond my geological expertise and finally the river for which the road is named.


Elephant Tusk: From Near And Far And In Between

I had an unpleasant experience on a solo backpack near Elephant Tusk, but it’s still a favorite Big Bend landmark (a type of poor judgment called “backpacker error” caused the unpleasantness). In these 3 shots, all from the River Road, Backbone Ridge shows up on the left (middle pix) and at bottom, Dominguez Peak (way left). Elephant Tuck is comprised of rhyolite and can be climbed, with some rappelling required. I had enough problems without climbing it; my trip there is why my husband now forbids me to utter the phrase “solo backpack.”


What Can I Say? Guys Now Have Us Figured Out. Damn!

What Can I Say? Guys Now Have Us Figured Out. Damn!


Circulatory System Of The Desert. Or Not

The capillary-looking maze on this bluff alongside the River Road would be a textbook case of hardening of the arteries if part of a circulatory system. The web of lines (2 bottom pix) are exposed veins of calcite. The white rock on the hill at top is the volcanic ash tuff. The colorful bands on the mountains in the background are layered volcanic rocks of varying colors (sometimes when I didn’t know the answer on a college geology test I’d fake it out by repeating myself in slightly different words — never worked then; maybe it will now). 😊


Follow my upcoming Kickstarter Campaign!

zackfrankphotography:

Our friend @zackfrankphoto is launching a @kickstarter campaign May 1! Plans to photograph America’s unknown wonders: http://t.co/4VfWVqgNTe

— National Park Conservation Association (@NPCA)

If you haven’t seen any of Zack’s photography of our national parks and monuments, you’re missing out. He’s awesome and this project of photographing lesser known, but worthy, sites should be both educational and beautiful. Check it out!


And What Part Of The Desert Is This?

Not the Northern Chihuahuan Desert where the majority of my posts come from, that’s for sure. I’m not home, though, and don’t have access to my computer. These shots from a not-so-desert portion of Texas were on my camera from a recent trip to the Houston area and since I haven’t been available to post for a few days and have my iPad with me, I figured “Why not?” That’s a rhetorical question. Don’t feel obligated to tell me why. 😊 I’ll get back to the desert (photographically speaking) and Tumblr in a few days. 🌵


Taking A Short Internet Break

It’s such a busy time right now I’ve got to cut out something from my schedule for the next 4-5 days. I considered letting the husband and kids fend for themselves, but they vetoed the idea so that only left computer time. It will be interesting to see if I go into withdrawal or not. Back sometime around mid-week. Luv you all (especially the 5% of you who occasionally “like” or reblog some of my posts or otherwise communicate with me). : )


I want this on my car bumper

I want this on my car bumper


Payback Time
I was going to visit my parents house to do this until I remembered the obvious: Been there; done that — many times while growing up. So I guess I’ll have to put my evil revenge scheme on hold until my kids have a house of their own (and hope mom doesn’t come over to my house with similar ideas!)

Payback Time

I was going to visit my parents house to do this until I remembered the obvious: Been there; done that — many times while growing up. So I guess I’ll have to put my evil revenge scheme on hold until my kids have a house of their own (and hope mom doesn’t come over to my house with similar ideas!)


Not Sure Where I Was But Know Exactly Where I Wasn’t

On a variation of the Where’s Waldo? theme, Where’s Jennifer? aptly describes my first solo backpack. I was a novice and planned to be with an experienced backpacker but she had to cancel. I decided I didn’t need her and informing my husband of this would be information overload for him. Also I knew he wouldn’t let me go. I thought I was in Fresno Creek (hint: I wasn’t). I spent an extra day in the wilderness because I had to find a way around so many obstacles like these pour-offs. I may have also been semi-lost. Was my husband mad? Don’t ask.


Should I Cross Over On That Downed Tree Or Not?

The correct answer was “not” but I couldn’t resist. The log wasn’t as sturdy as it looked, twisting from side to side and almost dumping me into the creek. I scratched my leg on my way to the far bank and once there my only option was to turn around since it was too brushy to continue. With such bad decisions in a urban area, no wonder my husband will no longer allow me to solo backpack.


So There’s Sports Outside The State? Interesting!

I wouldn’t go so far as to say I know zero about sports beyond the Texas Longhorns. OK, maybe I would, but I learned something last night. When I sat down to watch the last part of the basketball championship game, I asked my husband why they called the University of Connecticut “Yukon.”

"Connecticut is not that far north," I told him.

Then he spelled out UConn.

So now I know. For now.


Finally The Real Unbiased Truth About Climate Change
I’m so confused. Should I believe the overwhelming majority of scientists who rely on dry and boring facts and statistics for their conclusions or to self-serving right wingers who twist the facts for their own twisted agenda? What a dumb question. The right wingers, of course. As the print documentary above proves beyond a doubt, they always look out for people like me. Don’t they?
Source: The Daily Kos

Finally The Real Unbiased Truth About Climate Change

I’m so confused. Should I believe the overwhelming majority of scientists who rely on dry and boring facts and statistics for their conclusions or to self-serving right wingers who twist the facts for their own twisted agenda? What a dumb question. The right wingers, of course. As the print documentary above proves beyond a doubt, they always look out for people like me. Don’t they?

Source: The Daily Kos


I’m not a poet as you’ll discover soon enough if you continue reading. I wrote this — my first and definitely last — attempt at poetry during my cancer treatment when I was deeply depressed. I thought of the nagging feeling I’d always had that something elusive was just beyond my grasp if I could only find it. I wondered if I lived to be an old woman if I’d still be searching for that phantom deficiency in my life. Or if I myself might be that deficiency.

Melodies As Yet Unheard

Before taking her first faltering steps
She paused to listen
Or at least it seemed that way later
Looking back and trying to reconstruct
What it must have been like
In that early version of her existence,
The beginning of the metamorphosis
Between the Who she was
And the Who she is,
If indeed there is any difference.

Even then the music played
Though not often and never very long.
Silent refrains ringing indelibly upon her soul,
Anticipated really, more than heard.
But she knew it must be out there somewhere,
Or at least that it ought to be.

Her steps grew longer and then slower
And still she strained to
Catch the stilled cadence of different drums
Performing melodies as yet unheard
To lead her God knows where,
Ever further from herself and her own kind.
Once she swore she almost caught an echo
Left by a fading note,
But a scoffing silence
Hinted it was never really there.

Even now the music plays
Though her ears have no heart to hear.
Mute melodies reverberate a now hollow truth:
To orchestrate one’s life is not to stop
And marvel at some unfamiliar theme,
But to compose the score yourself.

—Jennifer Wylie